Visitor Information

Family. Friendly. Fun.

With 121 sprawling acres and over two dozen buildings and exhibition spaces to explore, you can count on your Adirondack Experience visit to be just that: an experience that’s action-packed, entertaining, educational, and fun for the entire family. From feeding trout, to bird watching, to interacting with craftsmen as they ply their trades, to strolling gallery after gallery of Adirondack art, photography, furniture, tools, cabins, boats and more, the Adirondack Experience has something for everyone.

“A great way to experience the lure of the Adirondacks.” – Trip Advisor

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Admission to the Adirondack Experience includes full access to our entire campus and exhibition spaces, including our new 19,000-square-foot Life in the Adirondacks exhibition. This new exhibition serves as the starting point for your visit, and will provide an unforgettable experience of the entire region.

 The museum will reopen on Friday, May 25, 2018

ADMISSION

MembersFree
Adults (18-64)$20
Seniors (65 and over)$18
Student with Valid ID$12
Youth (6-17)$12
Children (5 and under)Free
Active Military PersonnelFree

All admissions are valid for a second visit within a one-week period. Free admission to year-round Adirondack Park residents on 2nd and 4th Sundays.

Lake View Café

Take a break from exploring the grounds and enjoy a spectacular panorama of Blue Mountain Lake. The Lake View Café is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and offers hot and cold dishes, snacks, and beverages.

Picnic Areas

Visitors who wish to experience lunch in the great outdoors can take advantage of the Picnic Areas scattered across the grounds that can accommodate group and individual picnics. Each area includes trash receptacles and recycling centers, which all visitors are encouraged to use to help keep our campus pristine.

Accessibility

We make every effort to ensure that all visitors have a satisfying visit. Wheelchairs, wheeled walkers, strollers, hearing-assist devices (auditorium only), and transcripts are available; electric scooters are available for rent.

Pets

Dogs and all other animals are not permitted on the museum grounds. We value all our visitors with disabilities and service animals are welcomed with proper documentation.

Wi-Fi

Free Wi-Fi service is available in most areas throughout the campus during our open season.

Buy Tickets Online →

Download Our Visitor Guide

All the info you need to enjoy the Adirondack Experience.

Instagram

  • Happy Earth Day! This poster with Smokey the Bear serves as a reminder to leave a “Good Impression of the Forest”. 🌏 🌿🐻 🐭🦌 🦊 🐰 🍃
  • Print titled “Brook Trout from Brandreth Shingle Shanty” from ca. 1890. Looks like a good day of fishing!
  • “Ready for warmer weather..” - us too! @ceceliaimagery_
  • Two men on top of a rainy and fog covered Mount Marcy. From the Clarence Petty Slides Collection, 1970.
  • Signs of Spring- we’re waiting for ya! Photos by Edwin M. Briggs, transparency slides part of the Wildflower Slide Collection from between 1977 and 1990.
  • For #NationalSiblingsDay enjoy this photo from between 1915 and 1920 of Grover LaFountain pulling his brother Henry at the log farmhouse at Maple Grove Farm near Cranberry Lake.
  • Man steering a horse-drawn sled with sap collecting vats. Photo by George W. Baldwin for the Horse Shoe Forestry Co. in 1901. Many of the sap buckets, vats and special techniques were designed by its owner, Abbot A. Low, in the 1890s who was constantly trying to improve the quantity and quality of the product.
  • We just couldn’t resist sharing this photo from the collection for #NationalBeerDay!

From ca. 1912- wagon filled with barrels of "PABST Famous Milwaukee Beer” on high Street in Tupper Lake Village.
  • Abbot Augustus Low transformed the beautiful Horse Shoe Pond and surrounding countryside into an oasis for agricultural and industrial experimentation, a meeting place for the well-to-do, and a playground for getting away from his NYC activities. Shown are Horseshoe Forestry's sap collecting tubing and tank, and sap buckets. Learn more at our last Cabin Fever Lecture Series this Sunday at 1:30pm!

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