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Adirondack Journal

Lake Placid Olympic Games

Lake Placid Winter Olympic Games

Lake Placid has had the privilege of hosting two Winter Olympic games, first in 1932 and again in 1980. While games in the past were much smaller in scale than the extravaganzas they have become, it is still remarkable that a village with a population of well under 3,000 people could host an international sporting…

Adirondack Theaters

Adirondack Theaters

It is always special to see movies in the theater. Getting out of the house! Seeing your favorite actor on the big screen! Indulging in an array of yummy snacks! There are some exceptional theaters in the Adirondacks. The Palace Theatre located in downtown Lake Placid, New York, lives up to its name with ornate…

Hudson River White Water Derby

The Hudson River Whitewater Derby

Spring in the Adirondacks brings melting snow and rain, causing rivers to swell and rush through the mountains, providing perfect conditions for whitewater enthusiasts. In 1958, the Johnsburg Fish and Game Club organized the First Annual Hudson River Whitewater Derby, which became a nationally known competition. It began as a one-day, eight-mile race with 44…

Jim LaTour

Adirondack Faces

Photographer Mathias T. Oppersdorff had a knack for capturing the personality of his subjects. In the book Adirondack Faces, commissioned by the Adirondack Museum in 1986, Oppersdorff’s sensitive portraits demonstrate that the character of a place is reflected in the faces of its community. In the book’s introduction he wrote, “From the beginning I wanted to…

Adirondack Fire Towers

Fire Towers

Have you ever hiked an Adirondack mountain with a fire tower? Were you able to climb up to enjoy the view? Do you know about the important function the towers served in the region? During the early 1900’s a number of forest fires wreaked havoc in the Adirondacks. As a result, the State of New…

Hunting in the Adirondacks

Hunting in the Adirondacks

The Buck Lake Club Cabin is one of the Adirondack Museum’s largest artifacts. Once “deer camp” to the extended family of Mike and Hilda Virkler of Castorland, New York, the cabin as an exhibit shares the story of contemporary hunting and the traditions that surround “going into camp” with thousands of visitors each year. The…

Adirondack Bread

Bread in the Adirondacks

Bread is not unique to the Adirondacks, but the traditions surrounding this food have played an important role in Adirondack women’s lives for generations. Bread tends to be hearty and was a staple food for men mining and logging in the Adirondacks. Many routines have developed around the production of both “quick” and yeasted breads.…

Adirondack Spring Water

Adirondack Spring Water

The Adirondack Mountains have long been treasured for the healing properties of clean air, beautiful scenery, and sparkling water. The air and scenery could only be experienced in the Park itself, but water could be bottled and shipped elsewhere, and became a major export from the region during the 19th century. Urban-dwelling New Yorkers in…

Lumber Camp Cook

Lumber Camp Cook

Rita Poirier Chaisson was born in 1914 on Canada’s Gaspe Penninsula. In 1924, her father Paul Poirier, a lumberjack, moved the family to the North Country where logging jobs were more abundant. Her mother agreed to leave Canada with reluctance. The Poirier family spoke French, no English, and she was convinced that New Yorkers “just…

Adirondack Corn

Corn

In 1916, the New York Commissioner of Agriculture reported that Essex County is “by far the most broken and mountainous section of the state.” In spite of the fact that only about one-third of the area of the county is in farms and only about one-eighth improved farms, there is a remarkably good report of…